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Book: Ramayana, The Game of Life – Shattered Dreams

Ramayana, The Game of Life – Shattered Dreams by Shubh Vilas
Ramayana, The Game of Life – Shattered Dreams by Shubh Vilas

Recently I got hold of the book ‘Ramayana, The Game of Life – Shattered Dreams’ by Shubh Vilas. ‘Shattered Dreams’ is the second book in the ‘Ramayana The Game of Life’ series, after ‘Rise of the Sun Prince’. The epic Ramayana never seizes to amaze me every time I read, listen to the stories or watch it in a video format. Different styles of narrating the stories, from different point of views, the sub-plots and sub stories – I can reread, listen again or watch it again any number of times. So with that curiosity of finding something new, I decided to read ‘Shattered Dreams’ even though I had not read the first part.

‘Shattered Dreams’, the title of the book gives a bit of hint of the part of Ramayana covered in this book. Shattering everyone’s dreams except two (Manthara and Kaikeyi) in Ayodhya, the book is an emotional journey. The book starts with Dasharatha deciding to crown his eldest son Rama as the next king as he feels unfit to rule the kingdom because of his old-age. The first chapter describes about Dasharatha’s announcement of coronation of Rama and eventual celebrations and preparations. The second chapter deviates from the happening place of Ayodhya to Ravana, talking about his growth in terms of power and defeating the kings wide & far. The next subsequent chapters come back to Ayodhya where the world turns upside down. With Manthara’s evil plan succeeding, emotions change from happy & fun to dark & sad. This second book concludes with Rama going deep into Dandakaranya along with Seeta and Lakshmana, after turning away Bharata and rest of the family to reconsider his decision of exile.

Shattered Dreams is not like a regular novel which can be finished in one go. As the story progresses, there are many sub-stories with hidden messages in them. Plus the footnotes gives a detailed explanation on different life lessons which we can incorporate on our daily life. Shubha Vilas has done a commendable job in terms of this gem of an information.

Do I recommend this book to others? It depends on who the reader is. If you are someone who is reading Ramayana for the first time or would like to read it as regular novel in one go, then I don’t recommend this book for you. You will feel the narration a bit slow and stretched, with lots of details in each and every scene. But if you have read or know Ramayana and would like to take away something new and/or want to practice it, this book is for you. Treat this book as a daily dose of medication, take in bit by bit and enjoy the tidbits.

As per the Indian mythology, do you know how the peacock got those colourful feathers? From whom & why? Read the book to get to know about it. :)

Note: This review is a part of the Book Review Program by BlogAdda.

Interested in reading my take on few more books? Click here to read them.

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